Sibling duo takes the ice for their last year

Kaite Maher and Tyler Aki, staff writers

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Like the Vancouver Canucks’ brother duo of Daniel and Hendrick Sedin, South has theirs with senior captain Trey

Buckingham and junior left wing Ryan Buckingham.

According to Trey and Ryan, they have been playing hockey together ever since the ages of 4 and 5. When Trey

entered fifth grade, age restrictions prevented them from playing on the same team. However, when Ryan made the

varsity team as a sophomore, the two were reunited.

“For the most part [we have played together],” Trey said. “There are times when we have had to split up because of

age […] so that kind of got in the middle of it when we started playing travel hockey.”

Junior defenseman Daniel Arenson met Trey and Ryan through hockey when he was in eighth grade and has played

with them ever since. Arenson believes that the chemistry they possess is a big spark for the team.

“They know where [the other one is] going to be which is helpful on the ice,” Arenson said. “Their chemistry seems to

let off energy in the locker room and helps the team get pumped for the game. When one of them is gone, there seems to

be a leadership gap. They play off each other and it seems to be helpful to the team as a whole.”

Coach Jim Philibin has coached Trey and Ryan not only on South’s varsity team but also when the brothers were

members of the Glenview Stars before high school. He has noticed their brotherly rivalry, but on the ice it seems to be

good for them because they know that they need to work each other to become better players.

“They’re two different hockey players,” Philibin said.

Trey has more speed and quickness, according to Philibin, while Ryan has more agility and aggression.

As the younger brother, Ryan has looked up to Trey as a mentor and credits him with making high school hockey a

little easier.

“[Trey] is someone I can look up to,” Ryan said. “He has good leadership, so I can emulate his style of play, [and] it

helps make a smoother transition to the team.”

For Trey, playing with Ryan has changed how he approaches his leadership. The two exchange words so Trey knows

the thought process and mentality of the entire team.

“[Ryan] has taught me to slow down and realize that the change from travel hockey to high school hockey is hard,” Trey

said.

According to Ryan, there has never been much of a sibling rivalry between the two. While the brothers both agree that

they are very competitive, they realize they are playing the game for the same reason.

“We’re working towards the same goal,” Ryan said. “We both want to win.”

According to the brothers, playing at Soldier Field last winter was one of their most memorable experiences of their

seasons thus far.

“It’s a once in a lifetime deal,” Trey said. “[Last year’s team] would have been the team I [would have] chose to skate with

on that ice. It’s something you are going to tell your kids about.”

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